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tires

Wheels require regular care to maintain their factory appearance. Clean them regularly. Please note that warranty claims on finish will be voided if improper maintenance or improper cleaning agents are used. Typical road dirt traps moisture that, over a period of time, can cause corrosion. Brake dust, created by braking friction, is corrosive and can cause pitting of the wheel’s finish. Most household cleaning agents are too harsh and must be avoided. Mild dish soap and water is all you need to properly clean your wheels`. Care for the finish of your wheels the way you would care for the finish of your car. Do not use abrasive materials to clean wheels as they can damage the finish. Use caution when cleaning tires with a bristle brush and never use scouring pads. Use caution in automatic car washes because steam cleaners and strong chemicals that are sometimes used can cause permanent staining or corrosion. Never clean wheels when they are hot. Always allow wheels time to cool before cleaning with soap and water. Never spray cold water on extremely hot wheels. Chrome-plated aluminum: Clean a chrome finish using mild dish soap and water; dry with a soft cloth. After cleaning, apply...

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helmets

The motorcycle helmet has come a long way since its rudimentary beginnings as a simple piece of canvas covered in shellac. Over the years safety, design, and build materials have improved significantly, but even with all the advancements and being one of the most integral pieces of safety when it comes to motorcycle gear, people still have a lot of questions about motorcycle helmets. We have compiled some of the most popular questions and provided answers to them. Do you need a full face helmet for a sports bike? No you don’t NEED a full face motorcycle helmet for a sports bike, but you absolutely should wear one for several reasons. From minor tip overs to high-speed high sides you never know where the impact is going to be when you go down. Studies have shown that the bulk of impacts in motorcycle accidents occur to the rider’s face. Wearing a full face helmet ensures the entire head is much better protected than say a three-quarters motorcycle helmet or a half helmet. With its articulating face shield a full face helmet allows you to completely block wind and debris from getting to your eyes and possibly obstructing your vision. Lastly, riding at high speeds on...

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batteries

What are the manufacturer recommendations for your ATV? As a general rule, most manufacturers advise against using a discount or recycled/surplus batteries in your ATV. If you get a battery that is not sufficient for your ATV’s specific power needs or buy a battery of poor quality on the cheap, you run the risk of damaging your vehicle and costing yourself significantly more than the cost of buying a high-quality battery in the first place. Here’s a useful tip: when replacing or upgrading an ATV battery, snap a photo with your smartphone or camera so you have the specs handy for your shopping process. What type of battery do you have installed now? Modern ATVs and UTVS typically use one of two types of batteries: Conventional Flooded batteries and Absorbed Glass Mat. Conventional batteries need distilled water added every so often to maintain them, and AGM type batteries are sealed against leaks and spills and can be mounted in any orientation. Which one is best for you depends on the manufacturer specs for your ATV and whether or not you want to shell out the extra cash for the more versatile battery and easier maintenance cycle. Both are pretty much...

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tires

1 Nominal section width, expressed in metric, inch or alpha. 2 Ratio between tire section height and nominal section width. This ratio is not indicated when section width is expressed in inches (eg. 3.50-18). 3 Code for tire construction (- = Bias, R = Radial, B = Bias Belted). 4 Nominal rim diameter size in inches. 5 "Motorcycle" in abbreviated form. Differentiates motorcycle tires and rims from those designed for other vehicles. Not shown on all models. 6 Expresses the tire's maximum load capacity (pounds) at the pressure indicated (psi). 7 Speed symbol. Indicates the tire's speed. 8 Tubeless (TL) or tubetype (TT), as applicable. 9 The arrows indicated the direction of rotation of the tire according to the fitting position (front-rear); applicable for directional tires only. 10 Number of plies and material. 11 Abbreviation of "US Department of Transportation." Serves to indicate that the tire conforms to the regulations issued by the US Department of Transportation. Includes the serial # for the tire, and the last 3 or 4 numbers represent the date. Example 3805 means the tire was produced in the 38thweek of 2005. 12 Tread Wear Indicator, as applicable 13 Brand name and registered trademark. 14 Type of tread pattern and/or product line. 15 Indicates where the tire was produced.

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batteries

We answer this exact question, so for the best answer to this question, make sure to check it out. But for a quick rundown, here are the basic differences: Conventional: also called flooded cell batteries, these are the “old school” type of lead-acid batteries that have been around for over a century. They are made out of a case holding a series of lead plates soaking in an acid solution known as electrolyte, and energy is created by a chemical reaction that occurs between them. They are very reliable and the cheapest of all battery types, but they do require maintenance, are a little unsafe to use since they are filled with corrosive acid, and don’t perform as well as newer varieties of batteries. Gel Battery: these work in the same way as conventional batteries, but they use a gel form of electrolyte instead of the liquid battery acid that conventional batteries use. They aren’t typically used as starting batteries however – they are actually best used where deep-cycling batteries are needed, like in marine and solar power storage applications. These are often confused with AGM batteries however, and you do sometimes hear people refer to AGMs as “gel batteries” incorrectly....

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helmets

Motorcycle helmets are expensive so it is important to buy the right one for your budget, your head, your riding style and your confidence. We have published many articles about helmets. Just go to the search bar on this page and type in “helmet” and you will find many articles which offer advice. We have included links to some of these articles in our tips for buying the right helmet for you: Make sure it’s legal For the legality of helmets, check out this article. In Australia, it either needs the silver Australian AS1698 or UNECE 22.05 sticker or a label on the chin strap with E1 (or any other number which just corresponds to the country in which the helmet is made). There are many helmet standards around the world, but the most common is the Euro standard. If you are in the USA, your helmet needs to be at least DOT approved, but it can also have other approvals such as Snell and Euro. Type of helmet There are many styles of helmet: Full face, open face, half helmet, motocross and modular or flip-up. For maximum safety a full-face helmet is the best. Crash data from the aptly-named Hurt Report shows...

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